Developer criticises Oxford City Council over its housing record

The Oxford Times: The site of the Lord Nuffield Club The site of the Lord Nuffield Club

DEVELOPERS have said Oxford City Council’s record on affordable housing is “lamentable”.

That was the view of Cantay Estates Limited during the closing statements of the public inquiry into plans for new homes at the former Lord Nuffield Club in William Morris Close, Cowley.

Oxford City Council threw out the plans in November and the developer Cantay Estates appealed to the inspectorate.

It proposed 43 homes, 25 of which would be affordable, with access from Barracks Lane and two all-weather sports pitches.

Richard Kimblin, for Cantay, described the affordable housing situation as “lamentable”. He said in 2006 there were 3,816 people on the housing register, with 1,240 lettings then available, but now there were 5,067 on the register, but only 767 lettings.

For Oxford City Council, Simon Pickes said: “The city does not in any way seek to hide from the scale of the need for affordable houses in Oxford, the effect of the recession on the completion of affordable houses in the recent past, and the impacts of the lack of supply of affordable housing for those concerned.

“But the proposal represents, nonetheless, a modest gross and very modest net addition to stock city-wide to be weighed against the localised effect of the proposed development on open space provision clearly contrary to the up-to-date development plan.”

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A site visit was carried out by the planning inspector Mike Robins and both parties yesterday afternoon.

The three-day hearing at Oxford’s Town Hall ended yesterday and a decision will be made at a later date.

Cantay Estates has applied to build on the land three times in the past 13 months. The other two schemes were also refused.

Comments (4)

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8:00am Fri 17 Jan 14

Geoff Roberts says...

Get stuffed Cantay. You're a business, using a form of emotional blackmail in order to make money. Yes we need affordable housing but simply buying up every bit of land and squeezing as many properties on to it as possible, is to the detriment of us all.
Get stuffed Cantay. You're a business, using a form of emotional blackmail in order to make money. Yes we need affordable housing but simply buying up every bit of land and squeezing as many properties on to it as possible, is to the detriment of us all. Geoff Roberts
  • Score: 58

8:04am Fri 17 Jan 14

Geoff Roberts says...

£20,000 for extra policing. 400+ children in a non purpose built school with little space, next door. a narrow entrance to the development. Little space to park cars. Less area for rain water to absorb into. More pollution. Hollow Way already frequently bumper to bumper with 100 cars backed up from Garsington Road to Barracks Lane.
£20,000 for extra policing. 400+ children in a non purpose built school with little space, next door. a narrow entrance to the development. Little space to park cars. Less area for rain water to absorb into. More pollution. Hollow Way already frequently bumper to bumper with 100 cars backed up from Garsington Road to Barracks Lane. Geoff Roberts
  • Score: 54

8:10am Fri 17 Jan 14

Geoff Roberts says...

If people really want to address the the housing situation that there are perhaps some others who are more able to make the sacrifice.

For example: Who is checking how much Brookes University is growing? Brookes 'accidentally' took on too many people, they have to live somewhere, in houses that used to be family homes or in halls of residence that used to be on land used for more permanent local people who pay more taxes. Do we really need a giant, expensive David Lloyd gym or whatever the new building is being built there? It's like being in a room, outside rich landowners protect their space and keep stuffing more people into our little room, be thankful they say, you get shelter, no longer have to worry.
If people really want to address the the housing situation that there are perhaps some others who are more able to make the sacrifice. For example: Who is checking how much Brookes University is growing? Brookes 'accidentally' took on too many people, they have to live somewhere, in houses that used to be family homes or in halls of residence that used to be on land used for more permanent local people who pay more taxes. Do we really need a giant, expensive David Lloyd gym or whatever the new building is being built there? It's like being in a room, outside rich landowners protect their space and keep stuffing more people into our little room, be thankful they say, you get shelter, no longer have to worry. Geoff Roberts
  • Score: 51

12:47pm Fri 17 Jan 14

wobbler says...

Oxford is an ancient City, the majority of it is protected, rightly or wrongly. If every bit of spare green land is built upon in the Oxford suburbs it would be a very poor and depressing place to live. What options? Upwards or outwards.
Oxford is an ancient City, the majority of it is protected, rightly or wrongly. If every bit of spare green land is built upon in the Oxford suburbs it would be a very poor and depressing place to live. What options? Upwards or outwards. wobbler
  • Score: -53

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