Pink trike offers cerebral palsy girl a new freedom

Ten-year-old Judith Stickings of Risinghurst who has cerebral palsy, pictured riding her new trike with mum, Gillian

Ten-year-old Judith Stickings of Risinghurst who has cerebral palsy, pictured riding her new trike with mum, Gillian

First published in News The Oxford Times: Photograph of the Author by

TEN years ago doctors warned she would never walk or talk after “drowning” at birth left her with cerebral palsy.

But a decade later Judith Stickings, 10, has been learning to ride her first trike after donations of more than £2,000.

The youngster from Downside Road, Risinghurst, Oxford, suffers from cerebral palsy and sight problems after she had to be resuscitated at birth at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading.

In October last year her mother Gillian Stickings, 40, told the Oxford Mail her daughter longed for her own bike and the national charity, Caudwell Children, agreed to help the family fundraise for a specially-adapted, therapy tricycle, costing almost £2,000.

Since then the internet justgiving page set up by the charity has been flooded with donations and now Judith is amazing her parents by riding her new trike, with just a little help.

Mrs Stickings, 39, said: “Judith waited so patiently for the trike, but could hardly contain her excitement when it finally arrived – and now she is addicted!”

“She has a weakness on her right-hand side which makes it difficult for her to get around. But the company which made the trike came and assessed her needs, so it enables her to get out and about and exercise while supporting her body fully.”

Judith said: “It's brilliant – really great.

“It is pink and I have been out on it in the daytime with my mummy and daddy.”

Judith chose the colour of her trike – pink – and since receiving it has been showing it off to all our neighbours and the members of her church.

Her mum said her and Judith’s father James, 37, have been overwhelmed with the generosity of others.

Judith, a pupil at The John Watson Special School near Wheatley, was three when she learned to walk and six before she said her first words.

Trudi Beswick, chief executive of Caudwell Children said: “Seeing success stories like this is heartwarming. Therapy Tricycles can make an immeasurable difference to the lives and development of children with disabilities as it gives them their freedom and the chance to develop.”

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