Oxford University event offers unique insight into life of First World War poet

The Oxford Times: University event offers unique insight into life of First World War poet University event offers unique insight into life of First World War poet

THE daughter of First World War poet Edmund Blunden is to speak at an Oxford University event.

Margi Blunden will remember her father and his work at the First World War Poetry Spring School run by Oxford University’s English faculty on April 3-5.

She will talk about her father and give an insight into the poet, as the country marks 100 years since the war broke out.

The Spring School is open to the public and will bring together world-leading experts on the major poets and poems of the Great War.

Edmund Blunden (1896-1974) volunteered to join the Army when he was 19, despite winning a place at Queen’s College, Oxford, to read Classics.

He was commissioned as a second lieutenant and went to France in early 1916 and was eventually demobilised in mid-February 1919.

During his service in France and Flanders he spent two years at the front, more than any other well-known war writer, and fought in some of the most violent battles of the war, including the battle of the Somme and the battle of Third Ypres. His most famous works include In Concert Party: Busseboom and The Waggoner.

Other speakers confirmed include Adrian Barlow, Meg Crane, Guy Cuthbertson, Gerald Dawe, Simon Featherstone, Philip Lancaster, Stuart Lee, Jean Liddiard, Alisa Miller, Charles Mundye, Jane Potter, Mark Rawlinson and Jon Stallworthy.

  •  The Spring School will be held at the Faculty of English, St Cross Building, University of Oxford on April 3 to 5. To register visit english.ox.ac.uk and it costs £180 or £150 for concessions.

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