Pair grapple with woman in attempt to steal mobile

The Oxford Times: Pair grapple with woman in attempt to steal mobile Pair grapple with woman in attempt to steal mobile

TWO men tried to wrestle a woman’s phone from her hand in an attempted theft in one of Oxford’s main shopping streets.

The incident happened in Cornmarket Street at 5.45am on Friday, February 28.

The pair approached a 36-year-old woman and tried to take her mobile phone from her hand.

After an unsuccessful struggle the men left her alone and approached a man on a bicycle.

The first offender was described as a black man, 5ft 6ins tall with short black hair.

He wore a light check shirt, dark jeans and white trainers and carried a black rucksack.

The second was also described as a black man. He was 6ft 2ins tall with short black hair.

The second offender wore dark jeans, a black shiny bomber jacket and black trainers with a white emblem on them.

PC Paul Jones from Oxford police station said: “There were people in the area at the time on their way to work so we are appealing for more information for anyone who may have witnessed the incident.

“Also we are keen to speak to the man on the bike who the two men approached.”

If you have any information you are asked to call the police non-emergency number 101.

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Comments (3)

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8:51am Wed 5 Mar 14

EMBOX2 says...

Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them?
Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them? EMBOX2
  • Score: 3

10:19pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Oflife says...

EMBOX2 wrote:
Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them?
Ha ha! As a victim of multiple crimes in Oxford (and I know others who have been too), in Oxford or elsewhere, CCTV is useless. Assuming it isn't broken or switched off, the picture is too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot. If you read the papers nationally, there is MORE crime in CCTV monitored areas because of the culture of the locations, whilst sticking a REAL policeman (not woman) on the beat, who can chase and apprehend crooks, DOES reduce crime. But the companies profiting from the sale of CCTV gear are too good at their sales pitch, so the truth is obscured by special interests and greed.

And it's happening in the US too, where Boston and New York are now being flooded with advanced CCTV that will infringe on the privacy of the population whilst doing nothing to deter the next terrorist attack.

You live in a dystopia, where respect, discipline and common sense are replaced by technology. Horrible!
[quote][p][bold]EMBOX2[/bold] wrote: Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them?[/p][/quote]Ha ha! As a victim of multiple crimes in Oxford (and I know others who have been too), in Oxford or elsewhere, CCTV is useless. Assuming it isn't broken or switched off, the picture is too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot. If you read the papers nationally, there is MORE crime in CCTV monitored areas because of the culture of the locations, whilst sticking a REAL policeman (not woman) on the beat, who can chase and apprehend crooks, DOES reduce crime. But the companies profiting from the sale of CCTV gear are too good at their sales pitch, so the truth is obscured by special interests and greed. And it's happening in the US too, where Boston and New York are now being flooded with advanced CCTV that will infringe on the privacy of the population whilst doing nothing to deter the next terrorist attack. You live in a dystopia, where respect, discipline and common sense are replaced by technology. Horrible! Oflife
  • Score: 1

1:41pm Thu 6 Mar 14

locodogz says...

Oflife wrote:
EMBOX2 wrote:
Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them?
Ha ha! As a victim of multiple crimes in Oxford (and I know others who have been too), in Oxford or elsewhere, CCTV is useless. Assuming it isn't broken or switched off, the picture is too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot. If you read the papers nationally, there is MORE crime in CCTV monitored areas because of the culture of the locations, whilst sticking a REAL policeman (not woman) on the beat, who can chase and apprehend crooks, DOES reduce crime. But the companies profiting from the sale of CCTV gear are too good at their sales pitch, so the truth is obscured by special interests and greed.

And it's happening in the US too, where Boston and New York are now being flooded with advanced CCTV that will infringe on the privacy of the population whilst doing nothing to deter the next terrorist attack.

You live in a dystopia, where respect, discipline and common sense are replaced by technology. Horrible!
If as you say CCTV is " too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot" how exactly will it "infringe on the privacy of the population "?
[quote][p][bold]Oflife[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EMBOX2[/bold] wrote: Oxford's main shopping street. Surely the CCTV saw them?[/p][/quote]Ha ha! As a victim of multiple crimes in Oxford (and I know others who have been too), in Oxford or elsewhere, CCTV is useless. Assuming it isn't broken or switched off, the picture is too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot. If you read the papers nationally, there is MORE crime in CCTV monitored areas because of the culture of the locations, whilst sticking a REAL policeman (not woman) on the beat, who can chase and apprehend crooks, DOES reduce crime. But the companies profiting from the sale of CCTV gear are too good at their sales pitch, so the truth is obscured by special interests and greed. And it's happening in the US too, where Boston and New York are now being flooded with advanced CCTV that will infringe on the privacy of the population whilst doing nothing to deter the next terrorist attack. You live in a dystopia, where respect, discipline and common sense are replaced by technology. Horrible![/p][/quote]If as you say CCTV is " too fuzzy to clearly show who is in the shot" how exactly will it "infringe on the privacy of the population "? locodogz
  • Score: 0

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