Wantage man sentenced for kicking over drink at Abingdon police station

Jamie Weaving

Jamie Weaving

First published in News

A 28-year-old Wantage man has admitted criminal damage after kicking over a cup of hot chocolate in a police cell.

Jamie Weaving, of Springfield Road, was being held for assault at Abingdon police station when he kicked over the drink on December 30.

The assault charge was dropped but Weaving admitted criminal damage when he appeared at Oxford Magistrates’ Court yesterday.

He was given a six-month conditional discharge and told to pay £85 costs and a £15 victims’ surcharge.

Comments (14)

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9:07am Fri 21 Mar 14

liveinspain says...

What a waste of council tax money! Oxford police so pathetic.
What a waste of council tax money! Oxford police so pathetic. liveinspain
  • Score: -3

10:30am Fri 21 Mar 14

yabbadabbadoo256 says...

Seriously?

How about catching some proper criminals?
Seriously? How about catching some proper criminals? yabbadabbadoo256
  • Score: 3

11:24am Fri 21 Mar 14

Critical says...

Shouldn't have admitted that one, would have saved taxpayers money if he'd have said "sorry, I felt feint due to the temperature in here".

I wonder how much the Victims Surcharge was?! Bless.
Shouldn't have admitted that one, would have saved taxpayers money if he'd have said "sorry, I felt feint due to the temperature in here". I wonder how much the Victims Surcharge was?! Bless. Critical
  • Score: -8

11:32am Fri 21 Mar 14

Quentin Walker says...

An insight into legal procedure and Rules of Evidence is needed to grasp the thinking behind this.

I agree with the result.
An insight into legal procedure and Rules of Evidence is needed to grasp the thinking behind this. I agree with the result. Quentin Walker
  • Score: 1

3:30pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Whitto says...

Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it.
Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it. Whitto
  • Score: -1

5:19pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Open your eyes says...

That was an expensive cup of hot chocolate.
That was an expensive cup of hot chocolate. Open your eyes
  • Score: 12

5:20pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Lord Palmerstone says...

Isn't 28 a bit old to be showing off like this? Hope he manages to grow up before he reaches 30.
Isn't 28 a bit old to be showing off like this? Hope he manages to grow up before he reaches 30. Lord Palmerstone
  • Score: 2

7:05pm Fri 21 Mar 14

dant40 says...

Hot chocolate why in holding!!. More like a b&b. If they want a hot drink then give them warm water then no harm done.
Hot chocolate why in holding!!. More like a b&b. If they want a hot drink then give them warm water then no harm done. dant40
  • Score: -1

11:56pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

liveinspain wrote:
What a waste of council tax money! Oxford police so pathetic.
Why abuse the Oxford Police, it states clearly in the article, that he was being held at Abingdon Police Station.
[quote][p][bold]liveinspain[/bold] wrote: What a waste of council tax money! Oxford police so pathetic.[/p][/quote]Why abuse the Oxford Police, it states clearly in the article, that he was being held at Abingdon Police Station. Dilligaf2010
  • Score: -1

11:57pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

Critical wrote:
Shouldn't have admitted that one, would have saved taxpayers money if he'd have said "sorry, I felt feint due to the temperature in here".

I wonder how much the Victims Surcharge was?! Bless.
Read the article again, it states clearly the victim's surcharge was £15.
[quote][p][bold]Critical[/bold] wrote: Shouldn't have admitted that one, would have saved taxpayers money if he'd have said "sorry, I felt feint due to the temperature in here". I wonder how much the Victims Surcharge was?! Bless.[/p][/quote]Read the article again, it states clearly the victim's surcharge was £15. Dilligaf2010
  • Score: 0

10:05am Sat 22 Mar 14

Man on the Green says...

The Victim Surcharge is a government imposed levy applied at time of sentence at predetermined levels. A conditional discharge (which is essentially a delayed punishment - he would only actually be sentenced for this particular offence were he to be foolish enough to be brought back before the courts for a new offence, in which case, if found / pleading guilty, he would also be sentenced for the criminal damage offence) is intended to deter people from reoffending, and can be really quite effective. The prescribed amount for a conditional discharge is £15. The £85 costs charge is equally standard. The amounts raised by levying this charge go towards funding witness and victim support activities, women's refuges, and other measures that are intended to assist victims of crime. Many influential players in the criminal justice debate have argued that rather than subsidising the CJS, some at least of this money should be used to compensate actual victims of crime, who currently get drip feed payments of a few pounds spread over sometimes several years, which provide an additional, and often painful reminder of what they underwent. I have a lot of sympathy for this viewpoint.
The Victim Surcharge is a government imposed levy applied at time of sentence at predetermined levels. A conditional discharge (which is essentially a delayed punishment - he would only actually be sentenced for this particular offence were he to be foolish enough to be brought back before the courts for a new offence, in which case, if found / pleading guilty, he would also be sentenced for the criminal damage offence) is intended to deter people from reoffending, and can be really quite effective. The prescribed amount for a conditional discharge is £15. The £85 costs charge is equally standard. The amounts raised by levying this charge go towards funding witness and victim support activities, women's refuges, and other measures that are intended to assist victims of crime. Many influential players in the criminal justice debate have argued that rather than subsidising the CJS, some at least of this money should be used to compensate actual victims of crime, who currently get drip feed payments of a few pounds spread over sometimes several years, which provide an additional, and often painful reminder of what they underwent. I have a lot of sympathy for this viewpoint. Man on the Green
  • Score: 0

12:05pm Sat 22 Mar 14

AylesburyOx says...

How about not being a complete idiot in the first place and learn your lesson. I'm sure the police gave him no end of warnings about his behaviour and he pushed it too far. Given the amount of paperwork involved in making the charges against him he must have really rattled them, so fair play for making him pay for his crimes
How about not being a complete idiot in the first place and learn your lesson. I'm sure the police gave him no end of warnings about his behaviour and he pushed it too far. Given the amount of paperwork involved in making the charges against him he must have really rattled them, so fair play for making him pay for his crimes AylesburyOx
  • Score: 5

11:28pm Sat 22 Mar 14

LetsBeRational says...

Whitto wrote:
Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it.
Maybe he was annoyed at being held in a police cell knowing he wasn't guilty of assault.

He shouldn't have lost his temper but to drag this through the courts when people receive cautions for a lot less seems a bit heavy handed. Maybe the police went ahead because they couldn't get him for the alleged assault? Sour grapes?

The real issue is that our courts, and large parts of the justice system are being used to generate money, not to deliver real justice.
[quote][p][bold]Whitto[/bold] wrote: Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it.[/p][/quote]Maybe he was annoyed at being held in a police cell knowing he wasn't guilty of assault. He shouldn't have lost his temper but to drag this through the courts when people receive cautions for a lot less seems a bit heavy handed. Maybe the police went ahead because they couldn't get him for the alleged assault? Sour grapes? The real issue is that our courts, and large parts of the justice system are being used to generate money, not to deliver real justice. LetsBeRational
  • Score: 2

12:47am Mon 24 Mar 14

LetsBeRational says...

LetsBeRational wrote:
Whitto wrote:
Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it.
Maybe he was annoyed at being held in a police cell knowing he wasn't guilty of assault.

He shouldn't have lost his temper but to drag this through the courts when people receive cautions for a lot less seems a bit heavy handed. Maybe the police went ahead because they couldn't get him for the alleged assault? Sour grapes?

The real issue is that our courts, and large parts of the justice system are being used to generate money, not to deliver real justice.
That said, a quick search shows he probably does need to respect the law a bit more! http://www.oxfordmai
l.co.uk/search/?sear
ch=jamie+weaving
[quote][p][bold]LetsBeRational[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Whitto[/bold] wrote: Good, he should learn to respect the law. If he was innocent of the assault charge then he should have had nothing to worry or get upset about and therefore shouldn't have done it.[/p][/quote]Maybe he was annoyed at being held in a police cell knowing he wasn't guilty of assault. He shouldn't have lost his temper but to drag this through the courts when people receive cautions for a lot less seems a bit heavy handed. Maybe the police went ahead because they couldn't get him for the alleged assault? Sour grapes? The real issue is that our courts, and large parts of the justice system are being used to generate money, not to deliver real justice.[/p][/quote]That said, a quick search shows he probably does need to respect the law a bit more! http://www.oxfordmai l.co.uk/search/?sear ch=jamie+weaving LetsBeRational
  • Score: 0

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