D-Day 70: Live updates as Europe remembers

This live event has finished

5:14pm

With that, we'll be closing down our coverage of the D-Day memorials. Thanks for joining us.

5:14pm

As reported earlier, this is how the Daily Echo reported Operation Overlord.

The Oxford Times:

5:08pm

4:22pm

Mum Fiona Roy took her four-year-old daughter Elisabeth to the D-Day ceremony at Hamble marina to remember those who died for their country.

Fiona’s grandfather Charles David Letson was an officer in the Royal Dorset Regiment and was part of the second wave which landed on British landing zone, Sword beach.

“The most he ever spoke about it was that he had one leg full of shrapnel. Towards the end though he did talk more about it. My son asked him a few questions for a school history project and he talked for hours.

“I think it’s really important we remember what they did for us.”

4:19pm

The Oxford Times: Daily Echo reader Martin Curtis sent this image in. It was taken as the Dakota took off from HMS Daedalus at Lee on Solent to mark the 70th D-Day anniversary. The parachutist is waving.

4:05pm

At Hamble Marina families laid down crosses to remember the previous generations who fought and died 70 years ago.

Major Duncan Jennings, who served with the Royal Artillery in Kosovo, Bosnia and in Iraq, was joined by his two boys William, five, and Angus, three, to remember them at a D-Day commemoration service.

He said: “It is important to look back and say what we have now are privileges made by the dedication and sacrifice of those who came before us.

3:36pm

3:32pm

3:29pm

The Oxford Times: U.S. President Barack Obama, center, and French President Francois Hollande, left, participate in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France

The Oxford Times: King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands arrive at a ceremony in Arromanches, France, Friday, June 6, 2014 in honor of all combatants who landed in Arromanches on June 6 1944. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

 

3:01pm

An 89-year-old veteran reported missing from a nursing home was found in France marking the anniversary of the D-Day landings.

The pensioner, who left wearing his war medals, has contacted the home and said his friends are going to make sure he gets back safely when the commemorations end.

Sussex Police were called at 7.15pm yesterday by staff at a nursing home in Hove who said an 89-year-old who lived there had gone out at 10.30am and had not been seen since.

He had gone out wearing a grey mack and a jacket underneath with his war medals on, police said.

Officers began searching the area, including checking hospitals in case something had happened to him, and spoke to bus and taxi companies, but none of them knew where he was.

The nursing home received a phone call from a younger veteran from Brighton at 10.30pm who said he had met the pensioner on a coach on the way to France and that they were safe and well in a hotel in Ouistreham.

2:58pm

Union flags planted in the sand by the British Legion, Gold Beach, Asnelles, Normandy, France as part of the celebrations to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day campaign.

The Oxford Times: P

The Oxford Times:

2:55pm

At Hamble marina Second World War veteran Fred Dymond thanked all those people who turned up to remember those who died.

Fred, 96, who served on HMS Cumberland throughout the war: “It has been a marvellous turnout. It always brings back tears. It brings back memories of the day.”

Fred was a stoker on the cruiser ship which was deployed in the Far East while action was going on in Northern France.

He served seven years on board the ship from 1938 to the end of the Second World War.

2:42pm

2:19pm

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron meets a veteran at Bayeux Cemetery where they attended a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

2:15pm

The Oxford Times: MoD handout photo of of Queen Elizabeth II viewing some of the Royal British Legion standard bearers during Service of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery in Bayeux, France, to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron meets veteran Steve Garrard at Bayeux Cemetery after they attended a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

2:02pm

Children from Hamble Community Sports College read out the Royal British Legion exhortation at a D-Day commemoration service at Hamble marina.

For D-Day and Dunkirk veteran Lionel Tucker every word of the exhortation had a special meaning to him in remembering those who fought and died for this country.

The 97-year-old former mechanical engineer said: "I think that all our minds should be on those that haven't made it back."

1:57pm

Other veterans of D-Day were at Hamble marina to remember their comrades who died 70 years ago today.

Lionel Tucker was involved in the operations in the days after the landing on the Normandy coast line on June 6.

The 97-year-old, who was a mechanical engineer, said: "What we did 70 years ago I can't easily bring to describe in words.

"Today has been heart-warming. You think that you are the only one involved until you get something today. I makes you realise how many people are involved."

1:42pm

The Oxford Times:

The Oxford Times: At Hamble foreshore crowds gathered to pay their tributes to the brave men and women who died 70 years ago today on the beaches of Northern France.

Stan Rickeard was one of the veterans of the Battle of Normandy who remembered his brothers in arms who never made it home.

Speaking about the ceremony, the 89-year-old said: "I think it a wonderful display of thought for all those who lost their lives. They are the real heroes, those who gave their lives for our freedom.

"I think we must never forget that."

1:30pm

At a D-Day commemoration service in Hamble, Reverend Dr Peter Crick spoke about the role the village played in what he described as "one of the most important days in world history".

He said: "Many acts of hospitality went on within places along the Hampshire coast. People from this village remembered soldiers who went off and fought and died in that battle.

"The last pleasant thing they remember is seeing the residents waving at them, or sharing a drink with them or giving them a kiss before they went off to battle."

1:13pm

The Oxford Times: Normandy veteran Gordon Drabble, 89, from Sheffield, recently awarded the Legion D'Honeur, plants a wooden cross at the grave of a fallen comrade in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, Normandy, France.

The Oxford Times:

Normandy veterans take part in a service of remembrance at Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, Normandy, France.

1:04pm

The Oxford Times: Queen Elizabeth II lays a wreath at the foot of the Cross of Sacrifice in the centre of Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, during a service of remembrance, Normandy, France.

The Oxford Times: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Prime Minister David Cameron (centre) and Governor-General of New Zealand Jerry Mateparae (nearest camera) lay wreaths at the foot of the Cross of Sacrifice in the centre of Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, during a service of remembrance, Normandy, France.

The Oxford Times: The Prince of Wales lays a wreath at the foot of the Cross of Sacrifice in the centre of Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, during a service of remembrance, Normandy, France.

The Oxford Times: Queen Elizabeth II lays a wreath at the foot of the Cross of Sacrifice in the centre of Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, during a service of remembrance, Normandy, France.

12:55pm

The Oxford Times: U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at Normandy American Cemetery at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer in Normandy, France.

The Oxford Times: U.S. President Barack Obama, background centre, and French President Francois Hollande arrive at Normandy American Cemetery at Omaha Beach to participate in the 70th anniversary of D-Day, in Colleville sur Mer in Normandy, France.

12:54pm

12:54pm

Here is an archive report from the Normandy beachhead on D-Day, filed by AP reporter Roger Greene.

Greene had accompanied British forces across the Channel.

His copy, marked ''Delayed'', was datelined: ''On a Beachhead in France, June 6.''

:: ON A BEACHHEAD IN FRANCE - Hitler's Atlantic wall cracked in the first hour under tempestuous allied assault.

As I write, deeply dug into a beachhead of north-western France, German prisoners, mostly wounded, are streaming back. But the Boche still is putting up a terrific fight.

Shells are exploding all over the beach and out at sea as wave after wave of allied ships, as far as I can see, move into shore.

My escorting officer, Sir Charles Birkin, was slightly wounded three times in the first 15 minutes ashore and three men were killed within five feet of me.

Our heavy stuff is now rolling ashore and we not only have a solid grip on the beachhead but are thrusting deep inland.

The beach is jammed with troops and bulldozers for many miles, and now it has been quiet for 15 minutes, which apparently means the German big guns are knocked out.

Our casualties on this sector have been comparatively light.

I landed at 8.45am, wading ashore waist deep in water under fire to find quite a few wounded and some killed on the beach - and Nazi prisoners, very stiff and sour-looking already coming back.

Before embarking we were told there would be 10,000 allied planes attacking today and there is every sign our air mastery is complete. So far not a single German plane has been seen.

The night-long channel crossing also was quiet until the last mile.

German prisoners said Hitler visited this beach two days ago and they admitted they were taken by surprise.

Only a few hundred Nazis manned the beach defences on this sector. They laid down a terrific machine-gun fire, but were quickly overwhelmed.

As far as I have seen there is no sign of Hitler's vaunted Atlantic wall with its massive concrete fortifications. German artillery deeper inland is very formidable, but the beach defences are piddling, rifle-slits and strands of barbed wire.

12:50pm

The Oxford Times: The unveiling of a memorial by the Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust at Calshot Spit, the former site of RAF Calshot . Standard Bearer Pip Jones from the RAF Association Fareham , Pip is a former RAF Electrician who servered for 5 years based in Singapore in the 1950's

The Oxford Times: The unveiling of a memorial by the Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust at Calshot Spit the former site of RAF Calshot. Standard Bearers Dave Gammon from the Royal British Leagion Fawley who served in the Royal Core Transport for 12 years and  Pip Jones from the RAF Association Fareham , Pip is a former RAF Electrician who servered for 5 years based in Singapore in the 1950's

The Oxford Times: The unveiling of a memorial by the Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust at Calshot Spit the former site of RAF Calshot .

12:34pm

The Oxford Times:

Unveiling of a memorial by the Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust at Calshot Spit the former site of RAF Calshot .

(l-r) Pip Jones RAF Association , Kenneth Bannerman (director general Airpields of Britain Conservation Trust) , Cllr Keith Chapman and Dave Gammon , Royal British Legion Fawley.

12:14pm

In Hamble, several hundred people turnedout for the commemorations.

Thre were two D-Day veterans at the service - Stan Rickeard, 89 and Lionel Tucker, 97.

"It was a solemn moment when the last post was sounded as the crowd stood to remember those who fought and died on the beaches of Normandy", says our reporter Ed Stilliard.

12:08pm

A D-Day veteran was presented with a special award by David Cameron for his work organising pilgrimages to the landing sites for his comrades.

Grandfather-of-two George Batts, 88, the national secretary of the Normandy Veterans' Association (NVA), was announced as the latest recipient of a Points of Light award for his voluntary work.

As well as the award, Mr Batts was given the honour of being the British veterans' representative at the official state lunch held as part of the 70th anniversary commemorations.

Mr Batts was just 18 years old when he waded ashore on Gold Beach in Normandy with the Royal Engineers on June 6, 1944.

Today he is among the dwindling band of brothers who each year make the pilgrimage to France to honour the 156,000 Allied troops who stormed the beaches.

For Mr Batts the 70th anniversary commemorations hold a special poignancy because the NVA will be disbanded in November this year.

The passing of time has seen its member numbers fall from some 15,000 to around 600. And where there used to be 105 NVA branches, now just 44 remain.

11:58am

The Oxford Times: The Duke of Edinburgh, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, Queen Elizabeth II and The Prince of Wales attend the Service of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Bayeux, to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha Cameron leave Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: The French Prime Minister Manuel Valls (left) speaks with the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall as they leave Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: The Prince of Wales at Bayeux Cathedral during a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha walk with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott to Bayeux Cathedral in Normandy, before attending a service of remembrance for the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

The Oxford Times: D-Day Veteran 88 year old Victor Walker, formerly of HMS Versatile, arrives at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha pose with French Prime Minister Manuel Valls as they arrive at arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

11:42am

The Allied assault on June 6, 1944 was the largest amphibious operation in history and marked the start of an 80-day campaign to liberate Normandy.

Three million troops were involved and 250,000 lost their lives, but the end of the war was brought closer as the Nazi hold over western Europe began to crumble.

In a foreword to the official D-Day commemorative brochure, the Queen said that the campaign was launched to secure ''freedom in Europe''.

She added: ''This immense and heroic endeavour brought the end of the Second World War within reach.''

11:36am

US president Barack Obama paid tribute to his country's sacrifices at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, where nearly 10,000 servicemen are buried.

Mr Obama said the American commitment to liberty, which is ''written in blood'' on the beaches of Normandy, endures with a new generation.

And he told D-Day veterans gathered above Omaha beach that their legacy is in good hands.

11:31am

The Queen laid a wreath in Normandy for those who made the ultimate sacrifice for ''freedom in Europe'' at a ceremony to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

The Royal Family and Prime Minister David Cameron were joined by around 400 Commonwealth veterans for a Royal British Legion service in Bayeux to honour the fallen.

During a solemn open air ceremony at the Commonwealth War Graves cemetery, the Last Post was followed by an emotional minute's silence under sunshine and clear blue skies.

Moments after the Queen arrived, a fly-past of historic aircraft - two Spitfires, a Dakota and a Lancaster bomber - roared overhead as they flew in formation.

11:21am

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron and wife Samantha arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Prime Minister David Cameron and wife Samantha arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: The Duchess of Cornwall arrives at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: The Duchess of Cornwall and Samantha Cameron (right), the wife of the Prime Minister, leave Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

11:13am

Bayeux, a quiet French town close to the coast, was the first to be freed from Nazi control during the campaign.

The town's military graveyard was a fitting place to stage the open-air service as it is the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery of the Second World War in France, with more than 4,000 burials.

In bright summer sunshine the service of hymns and prayers was staged with military clergy conducting proceedings.

11:10am

The Oxford Times: Normandy veterans, including Ken Scott (right), 98, Durham Light Infantry, leave Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veterans arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veterans arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veterans arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veterans arrive at Bayeux Cathedral for a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veteran Ken Scott, 98, from the Durham Light Infantry, leaves Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times: Normandy veteran Ken Scott, 98, from the Durham Light Infantry, leaves Bayeux Cathedral following a commemorative service to mark 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

10:45am

The Oxford Times: People stand on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago.

The Oxford Times: A group of military enthusiasts stand on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

The Oxford Times: Men in WWII military uniforms gesture on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

The Oxford Times: A military enthusiast takes a snapshot of Omaha Beach, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

The Oxford Times: An American flag is placed in the sand of Omaha Beach, western France. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

The Oxford Times: Military enthusiasts walk on Omaha Beach Vierville sur Mer, western France. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

The Oxford Times: World War II veterans of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Hal Baumgarter, right, 90, Pa., and Steve Melnikoff, 94, R.I., salute during a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France . Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago.

10:35am

10:27am

Normandy veterans arrive Bayeux Cathedral to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings during World War II.

The Oxford Times:

The Oxford Times:

The Oxford Times:

The Oxford Times:

10:18am

At Sword, Brigadier David Baines, the national president of the Normandy Veterans' Association, read the lesson - Ecclesiasticus Chapter 44 1 - 14.

It included the lines: ''Their bodies are buried in peace; but their name liveth evermore. The people will tell of their wisdom, and the congregation will shew forth their praise.''

The choir of St John's College Cambridge, directed by Andrew Nethsingha, sung Psalm 121, followed by an address by the Right Reverend Nigel McCulloch, the national chaplain of the RBL.

He told the congregation: ''We come to remember those who from the air, in the water and on the beaches made the supreme sacrifice.''

10:13am

The Oxford Times:

This is the front page of the Daily Echo D-Day on June 6, 1944.

10:08am

David Cameron said he felt a mixture of ''awe and gratitude'' as he met veterans of the D-Day landings at the 70th anniversary commemorations.

The Prime Minister said it was ''incredibly moving'' to be at the events in Normandy and it was ''humbling'' for people of his generation who had not had to do anything like the heroic actions of June 6 1944.

The Oxford Times: David Cameron and President Obama will lead calls to Russia over their position on Ukraine

10:06am

It was at Sword Beach that thousands of troops came ashore from the Channel to help turn the tide of war into an eventual victory against the tyranny of Nazi Germany.

For many veterans, now in their late 80s and 90s, who have made the pilgrimage to honour the 156,000 Allied troops, this year's events will possibly be their last at the scene of their exploits.

The Oxford Times: The First Bucks, a territorial battalion of the Oxfordshire and  Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, land on Sword Beach on June 6 1944.Sword Beach, June 6, 1944.

10:03am

The ceremony is marks high point of the anniversary events, which has seen thousands flock to beaches, cemeteries and villages linked to the momentous landings.

The day's commemorations began at midnight with a vigil at the Pegasus Bridge, marking the first assault of the D-Day invasion when Allied soldiers landed in the dead of night exactly 70 years ago.

At 12.16am a team of six Horsa gliders carrying 181 men from the Glider Pilot Regiment and the 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, landed silently to capture the strategically-vital bridge and another nearby, paving the way for soldiers landing on the Normandy beaches to move inland and reinforce their airborne colleagues.

10:00am

World leaders are gathering in Normandy today for an emotional ceremony expected to be the pinnacle of events marking the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

Up to 19 heads of state, including the Queen and US president Barack Obama, are on Sword Beach near Ouistreham, one of the five battle zones on Normandy's coastline on June 6, 1944.

Comments (19)

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2:25pm Fri 6 Jun 14

skeptik says...

In your browser 'Old Time Radio D Day' - American news monitoring of Berlin Radio giving the news of the invasion and the days events as they occurred.
In your browser 'Old Time Radio D Day' - American news monitoring of Berlin Radio giving the news of the invasion and the days events as they occurred. skeptik
  • Score: -1

2:31pm Fri 6 Jun 14

southy says...

And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots.
Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night.
And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots. Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night. southy
  • Score: -5

3:06pm Fri 6 Jun 14

skeptik says...

OH JHC he is off again - this is not a contest on who did what and who is mentioned - you truly are a very odd character.
OH JHC he is off again - this is not a contest on who did what and who is mentioned - you truly are a very odd character. skeptik
  • Score: 2

3:19pm Fri 6 Jun 14

skeptik says...

For contemporary film (US issued) of Southampton and other ports (colour film of Totton etc) in Browser 'Critical past' - in search box--- 'Southern England June 1944' or 'Mulberry Harbours'---------- for Portsmouth and the building of and towing to sea.
For contemporary film (US issued) of Southampton and other ports (colour film of Totton etc) in Browser 'Critical past' - in search box--- 'Southern England June 1944' or 'Mulberry Harbours'---------- for Portsmouth and the building of and towing to sea. skeptik
  • Score: -1

3:38pm Fri 6 Jun 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

southy wrote:
And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots.
Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night.
It would be best if you watched the BBC News coverage, it mentioned HMS Belfast and just about every other nuance of the events, very difficult to cover everything in a newspaper article, there will always be someone that will complain about something if it is their nature to do so.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots. Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night.[/p][/quote]It would be best if you watched the BBC News coverage, it mentioned HMS Belfast and just about every other nuance of the events, very difficult to cover everything in a newspaper article, there will always be someone that will complain about something if it is their nature to do so. OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 5

4:03pm Fri 6 Jun 14

Gristy says...

southy wrote:
And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots.
Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night.
Well said southy, you are quite correct. I remember that day so well. I was 5 and a half. The troops massing all around us (Wimbourne) the tanks and field guns suddenly were no longer there. Then the guns which could clearly be heard across the channel and the sky full of aircraft. We were all so excited!
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: And not one mention of the Royal Navy Who's HMS Belfast signalled the start of D-day by firing the first shots. Also the men of the Navy who was not far away who done all the mine sweeping to clear the way for the ships to get in close, they also done some night landings 2 nights before, then only to find out that they had to do the same again the following night.[/p][/quote]Well said southy, you are quite correct. I remember that day so well. I was 5 and a half. The troops massing all around us (Wimbourne) the tanks and field guns suddenly were no longer there. Then the guns which could clearly be heard across the channel and the sky full of aircraft. We were all so excited! Gristy
  • Score: -3

4:30pm Fri 6 Jun 14

Realist UK says...

It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away.
It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away. Realist UK
  • Score: 8

5:51pm Fri 6 Jun 14

southy says...

A number people do not know because they have not been told or taught, that part of the D-day landings had to be there the night before, On the 4th June left to do there jobs for D-day only to find out that it had been put back 24 hours, which meant they had to hang around in the Channel, these same ships where then put on picket duty after doing the coastal work, to hunt and track down any Subs and patrol boats in the channel, a number of men was lost over those 2 nights.
A number people do not know because they have not been told or taught, that part of the D-day landings had to be there the night before, On the 4th June left to do there jobs for D-day only to find out that it had been put back 24 hours, which meant they had to hang around in the Channel, these same ships where then put on picket duty after doing the coastal work, to hunt and track down any Subs and patrol boats in the channel, a number of men was lost over those 2 nights. southy
  • Score: -1

6:33pm Fri 6 Jun 14

southy says...

Realist UK wrote:
It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away.
Agree Realist the lessons that was learned soon forgotten and a return back to how it all started.
[quote][p][bold]Realist UK[/bold] wrote: It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away.[/p][/quote]Agree Realist the lessons that was learned soon forgotten and a return back to how it all started. southy
  • Score: 1

6:40pm Fri 6 Jun 14

sburman says...

Realist UK wrote:
It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away.
Oh please, not politics today.
[quote][p][bold]Realist UK[/bold] wrote: It sickens me to see British MP's from all sides looking grave & thoughtful on this day. Those who lived through the D-Day landing and those who perished did so under the British flag, in honour and defence of our country and sovereignty. Oh, how those brave men and women would feel knowing our successive governments have handed it all away.[/p][/quote]Oh please, not politics today. sburman
  • Score: 5

6:52pm Fri 6 Jun 14

skeptik says...

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/products/loc
ation_history/Totton
_Hampshire_England/1
940/1944


The Salmon Leap Public House Totton 1944
http://www.criticalp ast.com/products/loc ation_history/Totton _Hampshire_England/1 940/1944 The Salmon Leap Public House Totton 1944 skeptik
  • Score: 0

8:06pm Fri 6 Jun 14

trishi says...

Thank you to all that were involved on D day . They gave there lives for a better future. As my grandad was Jewish an 12 years old and was saved by the D day landings 1 day after, he was jue to be shot that day so thank you again I wouldn't of been born.
Thank you to all that were involved on D day . They gave there lives for a better future. As my grandad was Jewish an 12 years old and was saved by the D day landings 1 day after, he was jue to be shot that day so thank you again I wouldn't of been born. trishi
  • Score: 5

5:25am Sat 7 Jun 14

skeptik says...

Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'.
Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'. skeptik
  • Score: 0

11:00am Sat 7 Jun 14

southy says...

You just got to love this, great little story

An 89-year-old veteran reported missing from a nursing home was found in France marking the anniversary of the D-Day landings.

The pensioner, who left wearing his war medals, has contacted the home and said his friends are going to make sure he gets back safely when the commemorations end.
You just got to love this, great little story An 89-year-old veteran reported missing from a nursing home was found in France marking the anniversary of the D-Day landings. The pensioner, who left wearing his war medals, has contacted the home and said his friends are going to make sure he gets back safely when the commemorations end. southy
  • Score: 1

11:09am Sat 7 Jun 14

southy says...

skeptik wrote:
Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'.
Do you mean this link skeptik

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/video/656750
20896_Allied-troops_
World-War-II_war-cor
respondents_bars-on-
bumpers_control-post
_D-Day-preparations
[quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'.[/p][/quote]Do you mean this link skeptik http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 20896_Allied-troops_ World-War-II_war-cor respondents_bars-on- bumpers_control-post _D-Day-preparations southy
  • Score: -1

11:46am Sat 7 Jun 14

southy says...

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/video/656750
22976_United-Stats-s
oldiers_Liberty-ship
s_Amphibious-truck_L
anding-Crafts

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/video/656750
77915_Landing-Ship-T
ank_navy-camp_sinkin
g-ships_artificial-h
arbor

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/video/656750
65480_Normandy-invas
ion_aircraft-in-flig
ht_officers-instruct
ing_studying-map

http://www.criticalp
ast.com/video/656750
38176_Allied-troops_
amphibious-truck_emb
arking-a-ship_lookin
g-at-pamphlets

This site have loads of films,
http://www.criticalp
ast.com/
http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 22976_United-Stats-s oldiers_Liberty-ship s_Amphibious-truck_L anding-Crafts http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 77915_Landing-Ship-T ank_navy-camp_sinkin g-ships_artificial-h arbor http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 65480_Normandy-invas ion_aircraft-in-flig ht_officers-instruct ing_studying-map http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 38176_Allied-troops_ amphibious-truck_emb arking-a-ship_lookin g-at-pamphlets This site have loads of films, http://www.criticalp ast.com/ southy
  • Score: -1

11:48am Sat 7 Jun 14

southy says...

southy wrote:
skeptik wrote:
Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'.
Do you mean this link skeptik

http://www.criticalp

ast.com/video/656750

20896_Allied-troops_

World-War-II_war-cor

respondents_bars-on-

bumpers_control-post

_D-Day-preparations
PS I should off added its not Totton its a place north of Romsey on the Stockbridge road
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: Totton the above link might not have worked - in Browser - 'Stock footage Totton Hampshire England 1944' - Colour film with a bridge and pub sign 'Salmon Leap'.[/p][/quote]Do you mean this link skeptik http://www.criticalp ast.com/video/656750 20896_Allied-troops_ World-War-II_war-cor respondents_bars-on- bumpers_control-post _D-Day-preparations[/p][/quote]PS I should off added its not Totton its a place north of Romsey on the Stockbridge road southy
  • Score: -1

12:44pm Sat 7 Jun 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

Southampton's contribution to the D-Day Celebrations has been rather pathetic, even Lymington has got a display by the Red Arrows today, the stone dead Council as usual offer nothing for its people to enjoy. Considering how important Southampton's contribution to the whole event in 1944, it has little to show for it 70 years on. The Battle of Britain Flight stayed at the airport for a while, they could easily have been given the opportunity to display had we had a public event organised in the area. We can't even organise a Flower Show!
Southampton's contribution to the D-Day Celebrations has been rather pathetic, even Lymington has got a display by the Red Arrows today, the stone dead Council as usual offer nothing for its people to enjoy. Considering how important Southampton's contribution to the whole event in 1944, it has little to show for it 70 years on. The Battle of Britain Flight stayed at the airport for a while, they could easily have been given the opportunity to display had we had a public event organised in the area. We can't even organise a Flower Show! OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 2

1:49pm Sat 7 Jun 14

Lynx says...

OSPREYSAINT wrote:
Southampton's contribution to the D-Day Celebrations has been rather pathetic, even Lymington has got a display by the Red Arrows today, the stone dead Council as usual offer nothing for its people to enjoy. Considering how important Southampton's contribution to the whole event in 1944, it has little to show for it 70 years on. The Battle of Britain Flight stayed at the airport for a while, they could easily have been given the opportunity to display had we had a public event organised in the area. We can't even organise a Flower Show!
p thompson
l aggree my father in law a d day veteran is 97 years old and finds travel difficult as usual southampton council is neglectful. maybe if the titanic had been involved it would have been different
[quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: Southampton's contribution to the D-Day Celebrations has been rather pathetic, even Lymington has got a display by the Red Arrows today, the stone dead Council as usual offer nothing for its people to enjoy. Considering how important Southampton's contribution to the whole event in 1944, it has little to show for it 70 years on. The Battle of Britain Flight stayed at the airport for a while, they could easily have been given the opportunity to display had we had a public event organised in the area. We can't even organise a Flower Show![/p][/quote]p thompson l aggree my father in law a d day veteran is 97 years old and finds travel difficult as usual southampton council is neglectful. maybe if the titanic had been involved it would have been different Lynx
  • Score: -1

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