Promise of 18 new jobs after £2m deal with energy firm

From left, Richard Hoare, Raymond Brown Aggregates project manager, Rod Lerwell, Viridor general manager, Paul Rowland, Viridor regional contracts manager, and Steve Cole, Raymond Brown Aggregates environmental and development director

From left, Richard Hoare, Raymond Brown Aggregates project manager, Rod Lerwell, Viridor general manager, Paul Rowland, Viridor regional contracts manager, and Steve Cole, Raymond Brown Aggregates environmental and development director

First published in News

A £2M deal brokered by the operator of a new waste incinerator plant due to start operating next month will create 18 jobs.

Viridor, which produces energy from household waste on behalf of Oxfordshire County Council at the new Ardley facility, has signed a 15-year contract with Raymond Brown Aggregates to process ash, a by-product of the incineration process, and turn it into materials for use in road construction and similar activities.

Mark Isaac, managing director of Southampton-based Raymond Brown Aggregates, said: “We look forward to developing a strong relationship with Viridor and sharing our knowledge and expertise.”

Stuart Sim, of Viridor, added: “We are delighted to have Raymond Brown on board.

“The company’s valuable knowledge and expertise will ensure at least 95 per cent of waste received into our new facility will be diverted from landfill.”




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6:20pm Wed 16 Jul 14

nat-obz says...

If it's jobs you want recycling creates around ten times more jobs than incineration, so by discouraging recycling the facility is destroying around 150 jobs. Studies show that incineration has low levels of jobs per tonne of waste processed, per pound of money invested, and per hectare of land used.
If it's landfill diversion you want, how much of the 95% could be reused, recycled or composted? And how much of the 5% will be so toxic that it needs to go to a special hazardous landfill?
If it's jobs you want recycling creates around ten times more jobs than incineration, so by discouraging recycling the facility is destroying around 150 jobs. Studies show that incineration has low levels of jobs per tonne of waste processed, per pound of money invested, and per hectare of land used. If it's landfill diversion you want, how much of the 95% could be reused, recycled or composted? And how much of the 5% will be so toxic that it needs to go to a special hazardous landfill? nat-obz
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