MUMS dusted off their boots to kick off a football tournament and raise money for causes close to the heart of a local club.

The Oxford Blackbirds event on Saturday in Blackbird Leys Park saw nine teams of mothers and relatives of players, many of whom were playing for the first time, compete in a series of matches.

As well as raising funds for the club, which has 15 teams, the tournament was staged to support the Williams Syndrome Foundation and the Charlotte Nott Trust Fund.

Among the players were 38-year-old Ciara Kitching, the mother of 11-year-old Rhianna Brennan who has Williams Syndrome, a rare congenital disorder.

She said: "I haven't played for a few years but we all gave it a good go.

"It was more about having fun than being too competitive but my team did actually win which topped it all off."

Mrs Kitching, who also acts as the regional co-ordinator for the Williams Syndrome Foundation, added: "Rhianna was diagnosed when she was one.

"The last couple of years have been quite difficult for her and the whole family as she's had to have two sets of spinal surgery and the club's support has meant so much to us.

"They call her the social butterfly, she loves being around people and socialising.

"It's a condition that develops randomly in the womb and is not very well known, even a lot of doctors don't know anything about it.

"Early diagnosis is important so we need to get the word out there."

Charlotte Nott, 10, was unable to attend as she was on holiday with family in Spain.

The Horspath - based youngster, whose dad Alex Nott coaches the under 12s side, lost all her limbs to meningitis in 2010 when she was two years old but has since travelled to Florida and gone on skiing trips.

Her trust raises money for continued support during her childhood and provides her with specially made prosthetic limbs.

Organiser Stuart Parsons said: "Considering the majority had never played before, it was competitive and people got quite in to it.

"We had a lot of people come out from the community to watch, we were really pleased with how it went."

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