Pub will be keeping it real with a pizza more action

General managers Lisa and Christopher Hoad

General managers Lisa and Christopher Hoad Buy this photo

First published in News

A KIDLINGTON pub has been given a new lease of life thanks to a £250,000 investment.

The Red Lion in Oxford Road re-opened for business this week having been shut for a month due to a major refurbishment.

The result is that it has been transformed from a predominantly “wet” pub serving mainly drinks to an operation offering a wide variety of food and drink with pizza a speciality.

The transformation has been overseen by general managers Lisa and Christopher Hoad who have been running the pub owned by The Orchid Group, which also owns the Dew Drop Inn in Summertown.

Mr Hoad said: “The people are so friendly here and we are hoping to attract more from Oxford.”

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Comments (7)

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7:51pm Sun 7 Oct 12

Myron Blatz says...

So another boozing venue being gentryfied in Kidlington - where are all the yobbos and drunken louts supposed to go now?
So another boozing venue being gentryfied in Kidlington - where are all the yobbos and drunken louts supposed to go now? Myron Blatz
  • Score: -2

10:28am Mon 8 Oct 12

King Joke says...

Let's hope they get drunk and loutish on supermarket lager in front of their 80'' plasma screens at home, and leave the rest of us in peace!
Let's hope they get drunk and loutish on supermarket lager in front of their 80'' plasma screens at home, and leave the rest of us in peace! King Joke
  • Score: -1

4:36pm Mon 8 Oct 12

paul from Kennington says...

Well another pub consigned to history, with The Squire Basset now a restaurant are our young kids ever going to know what a real pub was?
Well another pub consigned to history, with The Squire Basset now a restaurant are our young kids ever going to know what a real pub was? paul from Kennington
  • Score: -27

4:49pm Mon 8 Oct 12

Myron Blatz says...

Buy 'em a one-way 'booze cruise' ticket to Benitses or Ibetha, or maybe the Isle of Man - do they still usr the 'birch' on Man?
Buy 'em a one-way 'booze cruise' ticket to Benitses or Ibetha, or maybe the Isle of Man - do they still usr the 'birch' on Man? Myron Blatz
  • Score: -2

4:52pm Mon 8 Oct 12

King Joke says...

Paul, what is the problem here? It will still operate as a pub, with drinks served. The market for wet-led pubs is shrinking, and the alternative to a joint wet- and food-based pub is for it to be turned into flats.

On my manor, the Berkshire House, Duke of Monmouth and the Punter on Osney are still great pubs despite doing food.

I do wish someone would explain the meaning of an apostrophe to the manager though.
Paul, what is the problem here? It will still operate as a pub, with drinks served. The market for wet-led pubs is shrinking, and the alternative to a joint wet- and food-based pub is for it to be turned into flats. On my manor, the Berkshire House, Duke of Monmouth and the Punter on Osney are still great pubs despite doing food. I do wish someone would explain the meaning of an apostrophe to the manager though. King Joke
  • Score: 0

3:39pm Tue 9 Oct 12

paul from Kennington says...

King Joke wrote:
Paul, what is the problem here? It will still operate as a pub, with drinks served. The market for wet-led pubs is shrinking, and the alternative to a joint wet- and food-based pub is for it to be turned into flats.

On my manor, the Berkshire House, Duke of Monmouth and the Punter on Osney are still great pubs despite doing food.

I do wish someone would explain the meaning of an apostrophe to the manager though.
Not so much a problem, but due to the smoking ban, and the cost of beer in pubs, the traditional "wet customer" has nearly been eradicated, and as you say to survive they must change into restaurants with a bar. But I was commenting on the demise of the traditional pub, which in only my 40 years of drinking in them has changed beyond recognition.
[quote][p][bold]King Joke[/bold] wrote: Paul, what is the problem here? It will still operate as a pub, with drinks served. The market for wet-led pubs is shrinking, and the alternative to a joint wet- and food-based pub is for it to be turned into flats. On my manor, the Berkshire House, Duke of Monmouth and the Punter on Osney are still great pubs despite doing food. I do wish someone would explain the meaning of an apostrophe to the manager though.[/p][/quote]Not so much a problem, but due to the smoking ban, and the cost of beer in pubs, the traditional "wet customer" has nearly been eradicated, and as you say to survive they must change into restaurants with a bar. But I was commenting on the demise of the traditional pub, which in only my 40 years of drinking in them has changed beyond recognition. paul from Kennington
  • Score: 0

3:55pm Tue 9 Oct 12

King Joke says...

THe demise of the 'wet customer' was always going to happen. Let's face it, you'd be frowned up on returning to an office after four pints at lunchtime, let alone a building site or production line, as was common thirty or more years ago. People just don't drink as much now for various reasons, another one being almost total dependence on the car by some people even the shortest journey, which means no or very little alcohol intake throughout the day until they've got home.

Yes something might have been lost in the demise of the traditional pub, but some are things we can afford to lose, like a choking cig smoke, an intimidating atmosphere for women customers, and the rush to get a load of beer down your neck before a strict closing time.

The move to decent food has got to be good as well. You can't survive on crisps! THe most revolting thing I have ever attempted to eat - I gave up after one bite - is a 'beef batch' in a very traditional pub in Coventry in 1995 . It was no more than a lump of fatty boiled beef in a roll. No sauce, no butter, no mayo, no spice no seasoning. If this is what traditional pub food was like, most of us will be glad it's gone!
THe demise of the 'wet customer' was always going to happen. Let's face it, you'd be frowned up on returning to an office after four pints at lunchtime, let alone a building site or production line, as was common thirty or more years ago. People just don't drink as much now for various reasons, another one being almost total dependence on the car by some people even the shortest journey, which means no or very little alcohol intake throughout the day until they've got home. Yes something might have been lost in the demise of the traditional pub, but some are things we can afford to lose, like a choking cig smoke, an intimidating atmosphere for women customers, and the rush to get a load of beer down your neck before a strict closing time. The move to decent food has got to be good as well. You can't survive on crisps! THe most revolting thing I have ever attempted to eat - I gave up after one bite - is a 'beef batch' in a very traditional pub in Coventry in 1995 [equivalent to the rest of the country in 1985, it's pretty backward up there]. It was no more than a lump of fatty boiled beef in a roll. No sauce, no butter, no mayo, no spice no seasoning. If this is what traditional pub food was like, most of us will be glad it's gone! King Joke
  • Score: 0

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