Unearthing the history of relics found in garden

TREASURE: Anni Byard, centre, helps Lily Stevenson, 10, left, and Amy Godspeed, 10, identify their finds at Littlemore Village Hall

TREASURE: Anni Byard, centre, helps Lily Stevenson, 10, left, and Amy Godspeed, 10, identify their finds at Littlemore Village Hall

First published in News

WHO knew that there was a Bronze Age settlement in Littlemore?

Certainly not 10-year-old Amy Goodspeed, who accidentally dug up a 3,000-year-old flint core in her garden.

A Bronze Age man used the two-inch long core to chip tiny blades from, which were then used in delicate tasks such as skinning animals. Amy showed her find to archaeologist Anni Byard at Littlemore Village Hall on Saturday at a Portable Antiquities day for the area.

Ms Byard, who lives in Long Wittenham, near Didcot, held an ‘antiques roadshow’ for archaeological finds as part of the British Museum’s Portable Antiquities scheme, which has been running since 1997.

She said: “The best part of this project is seeing kids try to comprehend just how old 3,000 years is.

“When they get it, their faces light up.”

As part of the museum project, Ms Byard holds monthly bring-and-tell sessions at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

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