NEW proposals to revitalise a former boatyard in Jericho and create a new piazza are about to go on show.

A £20m vision for the former Castle Mill boatyard site was granted planning permission in 2016 but proposals stalled after a £500,000 bridge was added to the plans.

Tomorrow The Jericho Wharf Regeneration Company will stage a public consultation on its latest proposals.

The company’s representatives will be at St Barnabas Church from 10.30am to 6pm, to answer questions about the scheme.

The Oxford Times:

It is hoped the pre-planning application consultation will be be a step forward in a saga which has seen residents waiting 13 years for real progress, after a series of redevelopment plans failed to materialise.

According to the developer, the scheme includes a mixed use development with a new boatyard featuring three docks,

There will also be a new community centre with a cafe, sports hall, dance studio and spaces to rent.

READ AGAIN: Work on Jericho Boatyard could 'begin in the summer'

The former community centre building will also be included in the scheme and converted for housing.

The second phase will include a pre-school and additional commercial space.

Developers say there will be a mix of residential units including townhouses, and flats, including affordable housing, and a new piazza will be created adjoining the west facade of St Barnabas Church, together with a new pedestrian bridge across the canal and ‘winding hole’ for turning boats.

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A spokesman for The Jericho Wharf Regeneration Company said: “After a further two years’ work and consultation with the key stakeholders, we have endeavoured to produce a scheme which fulfils many of the aspirations for the site, whilst meeting the inherent technical challenges.

“If approved, work could commence in spring 2020 with a view to eliminating the current blight and bringing the site back into beneficial occupation.”

The exhibition will show the developer’s view of the latest plans for the whole site.

The Oxford Times:

The Jericho Wharf Trust, which incorporates Jericho Community Association, Jericho Community Boatyard, Jericho Living Heritage Trust and St Barnabas Parochial Church Council, said it has had ‘helpful and productive meetings’ with the developer about the community facilities but discussions are still ongoing.

A JWT spokesman said: “We still have concerns about the current proposals for the ground floor of the community centre and about the size of the public square.

“The development is now being promoted by the Jericho Wharf Regeneration Company, an associate company of SIAHAF, which obtained a planning consent for the site in 2016.”

READ AGAIN: Jericho boatyard development could be delayed yet again

He added that the key difference to previous plans is that community facilities could now be built in two phases, to be completed either together or in sequence as funds become available.

The trust spokesman said: “Phase one would include the boatyard and part of the community centre which would have enough facilities to run at a basic level.

“Phase two would build out the rest of the community centre needed for it to operate in the long term on a sustainable basis.”

He added that the proposals also showed plans for the commercial housing.

The spokesman said the new housing would now encroach more on the public square, which was now smaller than in the previous application and is fronted on the south side by housing rather than a restaurant – which made it less of a public space.

Although the developer has also had preliminary discussions with the city planners, it has not yet submitted a planning application and discussions will continue with the JWT.

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Once the application has been submitted, it will formally be open for public comment.

JWT trustee Peter Stalker said the consultation would be a good opportunity for local residents to give their views.

The Jericho Wharf Regeneration Company statement was issued by Stephen Green, whose email refers to Future Heritage.

Mr Green was unavailable for further comment yesterday.